A guide to growth on Youtube

YoungBonesGaming

Active Member
Hey guys, my name's Stahly, is now my third big detailed guide, this guide is mostly to help the "how do I get views" newbies.

A bit of background so you know I'm now talking out of my arse here too. We started back in February this year and we've grown a lot faster than a lot of people that started around the same time as us and overtaken a bunch of people that have been doing this for longer than us. As of posting this, we have 558 subs with over 50k total views across about 85 videos, most people a couple of hundred videos at this point.


Artwork: Branding


Right, this is something that a lot of new people par off when they launch their channel with the idea of "I'll let my videos do the talking". Don't fall into that trap as shoddy artwork can really hinder your ability to be seen and taken seriously. Shoddy artwork can be one of the things that make people perceive you as just a gamer rather than someone who wants to entertain on a professional level. You're going to want to build a brand with similar artwork across the entire channel between your avatar, banner and thumbnails.

Here's two channels that have recognisable brands. They're fairly large channels but they have a considerable brand to go with the success they've had.

NerdCubed - https://www.youtube.com/user/OfficialNerdCubed

As you can see with Nerdcubed's artwork, he has that red and white logo on every video. That's done the way it is so his subscribers know easily that he's released a new video as the name of the channel is tiny when you're scrolling and even on the subscription feed, you'll notice a thumbnail much easier. This is now more important than ever for the subscriber feed since Youtube rolled out their Grid view. A solid branding also makes merchandising incredibly easier if that stage ever comes along.

Funhaus - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCboMX_UNgaPBsUOIgasn3-Q

These guys have gone a slightly different direction relying more on their Orange and Black colour scheme rather than their logo. There's not really any colours that contrast themselves quite as nicely as those two do. They've been racing the Achievement Hunter guys to 1m subs and they're winning that race, I believe that recognisable branding is a reason for that.

Having decent artwork just gives you that professional looking edge when people stumble upon your channel and gives you a nice advantage over someone who hasn't made any effort with theirs.

Also, if you're thinking "Yeah, they have time for and can afford decent artwork because they're huge" have a look at our friends in Carbyne Studios (https://www.youtube.com/user/carbynestudios) they're also pretty small time, but they're artwork across the board is absolutely top of the line. Even if you don't have the skill, it costs the same amount to get templates as it does for a damn cup of coffee and lasts a hell of a lot longer, too.

If you're not sure with colour schemes or even if you are, have a look at Adobe's Colour Wheel and click "complementary colours" It's an absolutely amazing tool that a lot of people could benefit from.


Artwork: Thumbnails


A lot of people at the moment use the method of using game artwork putting their own text over it because they like the consistency across their channel, that's fair enough, but as a viewer the only video I'd avoid more than that is one without a custom thumbmail. Custom stuff generally works best to pull in new people.


This thumbnail (http://imgur.com/yUcfnB9) is one of my better ones and took a little more work than the standard ones we do, because of the type of video, and the inclusion of face-cam in the video. I thought it fitting to include screenshots of us from the video. All I've done on those is grab the screenshot from Premier, open in photoshop, use the quick select/magic wand tool to select the area around the subject, refined the edge and added an outer glow with a drop shadow on the text to make it stand out. After doing it a couple of times it becomes a fairly fast process. For the background of it, I've got another screenshot from the video (I tend to think of places to grab these when recording) and blurred ran a blur tool over it, so the eye is more naturally drawn to the text rather than trying to make out what's in the background. Along with this is the font we've used across our channel, the GTA logo and the Oculus logo to give a clear indication of what the video will entail. Again, that's one of our more complicated ones. Because it's got a decent thumbnail, it draws people in from the search results as well, these are the people you're going for, after all.

I also made this one (http://imgur.com/cWQvAf7) as part of a channel critique I gave a while ago, so I cut a couple of corners making it as it was just an example. The original image had a realy washed out and blurred plume of flames, but the fire gave the screeenshot a really nice eye-catching center piece. Here I've just found an explosion image with a transparent background and cut it into the picture, to make it look like it's coming from the plane, I've just cut around the plane and created a separate layer for the flames to sit behind. Again here I've included the game logo and the branded font from our logo and banner. It's far from perfect, but it took five minutes and draws my eye a lot more than the standard shadowed figure with two guns crossed at the chest that oh so many channels would use, you know?

I learned all of this stuff from from this video made by Adam Kovic of Funhaus, who's been doing youtube since youtube became a thing. He talks a lot about how to draw the eye, the thumbnail he's making may not be your style but the points he makes are perfect for what we do.


Search Engine Optimisation (SEO)


Again, I am going to be using one of our recent successes as my example here, purely because I know how I done it.

This one is a bit of a mystery to a lot of people and I usually just show people to another resource that cleared everything up for me. This is how people are going to stumble across your content. In short, your tags will effectively be search terms that you've linked to your video. This is going to be more of a part for the one-off/first impressions guys (as it's what we do) but the info below will still give you a good idea on what to do if you're more the multi-part player.

We recently put up a video which is now the number one search result for that game, because we hit the game (well... demo) the day after it came out and really nailed the SEO for it.

Here's a couple of screenshots:

Search Result - Number 1 for the "Gameplay" tag, so it's done well.

Tags used (http://imgur.com/FPOUJbz) - Now here you're wanting to tag things like alternative titles for the video and anything the video includes. Completely ignore the recommended tags as they're a waste of time and a waste of space for decent tags. You can also include things like the build of the game (especially if you're doing Minecraft stuff), the name of any mods you're using, whack in the "gameplay" tag etc etc.

Title and Description used (http://imgur.com/wcoC8Wt) - This description could have been more, but for a game that's only three minutes long that even the developer didn't say much about, this was all I could manage. The idea here, is to fill the description and title with as many keywords as makes sense to add in. As you can see, I've added "Oculus Rift DK2" and "Back to Dinosaur Island Gameplay" a coulple of times between the title, description and tags.

It's at this point that I'd like to point out that since getting those original screenshots, the video has now rocketed to 22k views, 70% of which are search results. Getting that as our final figure was no accident either as having a high quality thumbnail really pulled people in.


Social Media

I'm going to go with Twitter first of all, because it's the best place to speak to others about what we do and if you follow a bunch of other creators, then it's amazingly helpful for keeping motivated. Support each other and just chat. We talk absolute bollocks on our Twitter, but we get a lot of laughs from it, and I've now started using the channel twitter more than my personal because it's a lot more satisfying. There's always a Twitter thread to be found on the subreddit somewhere and I can't recommend it enough to get involved. Don't just link dump and run, otherwise you'll never get any interaction. Give something to the people that they can discuss with you, jump in on conversations that people are having. Because of the great community here and on Twitter, I recently sent out a tweet asking for everyone we've helped in the last few months help us reach 450 subs and we got eight new people that night because we've been consitent personalities. With Twitter you're basically convincing people that follow you on there to click through on a video.

If you're here, then you're already getting involved in a community if it's 2016, then I probably sent you here), but get more involved. Share what you know. Help people with things that you know you can help on, not just with the idea to get some views yourself but to be a decent person, there's way too much competitiveness in the whole LP community, but if we can all band together and help out, then we can all grow a little bigger than those who are trying to go it alone.


As a sidenote, I've said it a lot in comments and I'll say it until Youtube stops being a thing, but to everyone making content: create the videos that you'd want to see

No TL;DR for you.
 

KOB_YT

Member
Hey guys, my name's Stahly, is now my third big detailed guide, this guide is mostly to help the "how do I get views" newbies.

A bit of background so you know I'm now talking out of my arse here too. We started back in February this year and we've grown a lot faster than a lot of people that started around the same time as us and overtaken a bunch of people that have been doing this for longer than us. As of posting this, we have 558 subs with over 50k total views across about 85 videos, most people a couple of hundred videos at this point.


Artwork: Branding


Right, this is something that a lot of new people par off when they launch their channel with the idea of "I'll let my videos do the talking". Don't fall into that trap as shoddy artwork can really hinder your ability to be seen and taken seriously. Shoddy artwork can be one of the things that make people perceive you as just a gamer rather than someone who wants to entertain on a professional level. You're going to want to build a brand with similar artwork across the entire channel between your avatar, banner and thumbnails.

Here's two channels that have recognisable brands. They're fairly large channels but they have a considerable brand to go with the success they've had.

NerdCubed - https://www.youtube.com/user/OfficialNerdCubed

As you can see with Nerdcubed's artwork, he has that red and white logo on every video. That's done the way it is so his subscribers know easily that he's released a new video as the name of the channel is tiny when you're scrolling and even on the subscription feed, you'll notice a thumbnail much easier. This is now more important than ever for the subscriber feed since Youtube rolled out their Grid view. A solid branding also makes merchandising incredibly easier if that stage ever comes along.

Funhaus - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCboMX_UNgaPBsUOIgasn3-Q

These guys have gone a slightly different direction relying more on their Orange and Black colour scheme rather than their logo. There's not really any colours that contrast themselves quite as nicely as those two do. They've been racing the Achievement Hunter guys to 1m subs and they're winning that race, I believe that recognisable branding is a reason for that.

Having decent artwork just gives you that professional looking edge when people stumble upon your channel and gives you a nice advantage over someone who hasn't made any effort with theirs.

Also, if you're thinking "Yeah, they have time for and can afford decent artwork because they're huge" have a look at our friends in Carbyne Studios (https://www.youtube.com/user/carbynestudios) they're also pretty small time, but they're artwork across the board is absolutely top of the line. Even if you don't have the skill, it costs the same amount to get templates as it does for a damn cup of coffee and lasts a hell of a lot longer, too.

If you're not sure with colour schemes or even if you are, have a look at Adobe's Colour Wheel and click "complementary colours" It's an absolutely amazing tool that a lot of people could benefit from.


Artwork: Thumbnails


A lot of people at the moment use the method of using game artwork putting their own text over it because they like the consistency across their channel, that's fair enough, but as a viewer the only video I'd avoid more than that is one without a custom thumbmail. Custom stuff generally works best to pull in new people.


This thumbnail (http://imgur.com/yUcfnB9) is one of my better ones and took a little more work than the standard ones we do, because of the type of video, and the inclusion of face-cam in the video. I thought it fitting to include screenshots of us from the video. All I've done on those is grab the screenshot from Premier, open in photoshop, use the quick select/magic wand tool to select the area around the subject, refined the edge and added an outer glow with a drop shadow on the text to make it stand out. After doing it a couple of times it becomes a fairly fast process. For the background of it, I've got another screenshot from the video (I tend to think of places to grab these when recording) and blurred ran a blur tool over it, so the eye is more naturally drawn to the text rather than trying to make out what's in the background. Along with this is the font we've used across our channel, the GTA logo and the Oculus logo to give a clear indication of what the video will entail. Again, that's one of our more complicated ones. Because it's got a decent thumbnail, it draws people in from the search results as well, these are the people you're going for, after all.

I also made this one (http://imgur.com/cWQvAf7) as part of a channel critique I gave a while ago, so I cut a couple of corners making it as it was just an example. The original image had a realy washed out and blurred plume of flames, but the fire gave the screeenshot a really nice eye-catching center piece. Here I've just found an explosion image with a transparent background and cut it into the picture, to make it look like it's coming from the plane, I've just cut around the plane and created a separate layer for the flames to sit behind. Again here I've included the game logo and the branded font from our logo and banner. It's far from perfect, but it took five minutes and draws my eye a lot more than the standard shadowed figure with two guns crossed at the chest that oh so many channels would use, you know?

I learned all of this stuff from from this video made by Adam Kovic of Funhaus, who's been doing youtube since youtube became a thing. He talks a lot about how to draw the eye, the thumbnail he's making may not be your style but the points he makes are perfect for what we do.


Search Engine Optimisation (SEO)


Again, I am going to be using one of our recent successes as my example here, purely because I know how I done it.

This one is a bit of a mystery to a lot of people and I usually just show people to another resource that cleared everything up for me. This is how people are going to stumble across your content. In short, your tags will effectively be search terms that you've linked to your video. This is going to be more of a part for the one-off/first impressions guys (as it's what we do) but the info below will still give you a good idea on what to do if you're more the multi-part player.

We recently put up a video which is now the number one search result for that game, because we hit the game (well... demo) the day after it came out and really nailed the SEO for it.

Here's a couple of screenshots:

Search Result - Number 1 for the "Gameplay" tag, so it's done well.

Tags used (http://imgur.com/FPOUJbz) - Now here you're wanting to tag things like alternative titles for the video and anything the video includes. Completely ignore the recommended tags as they're a waste of time and a waste of space for decent tags. You can also include things like the build of the game (especially if you're doing Minecraft stuff), the name of any mods you're using, whack in the "gameplay" tag etc etc.

Title and Description used (http://imgur.com/wcoC8Wt) - This description could have been more, but for a game that's only three minutes long that even the developer didn't say much about, this was all I could manage. The idea here, is to fill the description and title with as many keywords as makes sense to add in. As you can see, I've added "Oculus Rift DK2" and "Back to Dinosaur Island Gameplay" a coulple of times between the title, description and tags.

It's at this point that I'd like to point out that since getting those original screenshots, the video has now rocketed to 22k views, 70% of which are search results. Getting that as our final figure was no accident either as having a high quality thumbnail really pulled people in.


Social Media

I'm going to go with Twitter first of all, because it's the best place to speak to others about what we do and if you follow a bunch of other creators, then it's amazingly helpful for keeping motivated. Support each other and just chat. We talk absolute bollocks on our Twitter, but we get a lot of laughs from it, and I've now started using the channel twitter more than my personal because it's a lot more satisfying. There's always a Twitter thread to be found on the subreddit somewhere and I can't recommend it enough to get involved. Don't just link dump and run, otherwise you'll never get any interaction. Give something to the people that they can discuss with you, jump in on conversations that people are having. Because of the great community here and on Twitter, I recently sent out a tweet asking for everyone we've helped in the last few months help us reach 450 subs and we got eight new people that night because we've been consitent personalities. With Twitter you're basically convincing people that follow you on there to click through on a video.

If you're here, then you're already getting involved in a community if it's 2016, then I probably sent you here), but get more involved. Share what you know. Help people with things that you know you can help on, not just with the idea to get some views yourself but to be a decent person, there's way too much competitiveness in the whole LP community, but if we can all band together and help out, then we can all grow a little bigger than those who are trying to go it alone.


As a sidenote, I've said it a lot in comments and I'll say it until Youtube stops being a thing, but to everyone making content: create the videos that you'd want to see

No TL;DR for you.
Absolutely love this mate ! keep it up :D
 

Ozmodion

Member
great write-up guys, thanks for the tips. Out of all of that i think being more social is the key that i don't do but will do more of. I just cant get my head around how twitter works grrrr.
 

DigitalDan

Member
Hey guys, my name's Stahly, is now my third big detailed guide, this guide is mostly to help the "how do I get views" newbies.

A bit of background so you know I'm now talking out of my arse here too. We started back in February this year and we've grown a lot faster than a lot of people that started around the same time as us and overtaken a bunch of people that have been doing this for longer than us. As of posting this, we have 558 subs with over 50k total views across about 85 videos, most people a couple of hundred videos at this point.


Artwork: Branding


Right, this is something that a lot of new people par off when they launch their channel with the idea of "I'll let my videos do the talking". Don't fall into that trap as shoddy artwork can really hinder your ability to be seen and taken seriously. Shoddy artwork can be one of the things that make people perceive you as just a gamer rather than someone who wants to entertain on a professional level. You're going to want to build a brand with similar artwork across the entire channel between your avatar, banner and thumbnails.

Here's two channels that have recognisable brands. They're fairly large channels but they have a considerable brand to go with the success they've had.

NerdCubed - https://www.youtube.com/user/OfficialNerdCubed

As you can see with Nerdcubed's artwork, he has that red and white logo on every video. That's done the way it is so his subscribers know easily that he's released a new video as the name of the channel is tiny when you're scrolling and even on the subscription feed, you'll notice a thumbnail much easier. This is now more important than ever for the subscriber feed since Youtube rolled out their Grid view. A solid branding also makes merchandising incredibly easier if that stage ever comes along.

Funhaus - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCboMX_UNgaPBsUOIgasn3-Q

These guys have gone a slightly different direction relying more on their Orange and Black colour scheme rather than their logo. There's not really any colours that contrast themselves quite as nicely as those two do. They've been racing the Achievement Hunter guys to 1m subs and they're winning that race, I believe that recognisable branding is a reason for that.

Having decent artwork just gives you that professional looking edge when people stumble upon your channel and gives you a nice advantage over someone who hasn't made any effort with theirs.

Also, if you're thinking "Yeah, they have time for and can afford decent artwork because they're huge" have a look at our friends in Carbyne Studios (https://www.youtube.com/user/carbynestudios) they're also pretty small time, but they're artwork across the board is absolutely top of the line. Even if you don't have the skill, it costs the same amount to get templates as it does for a damn cup of coffee and lasts a hell of a lot longer, too.

If you're not sure with colour schemes or even if you are, have a look at Adobe's Colour Wheel and click "complementary colours" It's an absolutely amazing tool that a lot of people could benefit from.


Artwork: Thumbnails


A lot of people at the moment use the method of using game artwork putting their own text over it because they like the consistency across their channel, that's fair enough, but as a viewer the only video I'd avoid more than that is one without a custom thumbmail. Custom stuff generally works best to pull in new people.


This thumbnail (http://imgur.com/yUcfnB9) is one of my better ones and took a little more work than the standard ones we do, because of the type of video, and the inclusion of face-cam in the video. I thought it fitting to include screenshots of us from the video. All I've done on those is grab the screenshot from Premier, open in photoshop, use the quick select/magic wand tool to select the area around the subject, refined the edge and added an outer glow with a drop shadow on the text to make it stand out. After doing it a couple of times it becomes a fairly fast process. For the background of it, I've got another screenshot from the video (I tend to think of places to grab these when recording) and blurred ran a blur tool over it, so the eye is more naturally drawn to the text rather than trying to make out what's in the background. Along with this is the font we've used across our channel, the GTA logo and the Oculus logo to give a clear indication of what the video will entail. Again, that's one of our more complicated ones. Because it's got a decent thumbnail, it draws people in from the search results as well, these are the people you're going for, after all.

I also made this one (http://imgur.com/cWQvAf7) as part of a channel critique I gave a while ago, so I cut a couple of corners making it as it was just an example. The original image had a realy washed out and blurred plume of flames, but the fire gave the screeenshot a really nice eye-catching center piece. Here I've just found an explosion image with a transparent background and cut it into the picture, to make it look like it's coming from the plane, I've just cut around the plane and created a separate layer for the flames to sit behind. Again here I've included the game logo and the branded font from our logo and banner. It's far from perfect, but it took five minutes and draws my eye a lot more than the standard shadowed figure with two guns crossed at the chest that oh so many channels would use, you know?

I learned all of this stuff from from this video made by Adam Kovic of Funhaus, who's been doing youtube since youtube became a thing. He talks a lot about how to draw the eye, the thumbnail he's making may not be your style but the points he makes are perfect for what we do.


Search Engine Optimisation (SEO)


Again, I am going to be using one of our recent successes as my example here, purely because I know how I done it.

This one is a bit of a mystery to a lot of people and I usually just show people to another resource that cleared everything up for me. This is how people are going to stumble across your content. In short, your tags will effectively be search terms that you've linked to your video. This is going to be more of a part for the one-off/first impressions guys (as it's what we do) but the info below will still give you a good idea on what to do if you're more the multi-part player.

We recently put up a video which is now the number one search result for that game, because we hit the game (well... demo) the day after it came out and really nailed the SEO for it.

Here's a couple of screenshots:

Search Result - Number 1 for the "Gameplay" tag, so it's done well.

Tags used (http://imgur.com/FPOUJbz) - Now here you're wanting to tag things like alternative titles for the video and anything the video includes. Completely ignore the recommended tags as they're a waste of time and a waste of space for decent tags. You can also include things like the build of the game (especially if you're doing Minecraft stuff), the name of any mods you're using, whack in the "gameplay" tag etc etc.

Title and Description used (http://imgur.com/wcoC8Wt) - This description could have been more, but for a game that's only three minutes long that even the developer didn't say much about, this was all I could manage. The idea here, is to fill the description and title with as many keywords as makes sense to add in. As you can see, I've added "Oculus Rift DK2" and "Back to Dinosaur Island Gameplay" a coulple of times between the title, description and tags.

It's at this point that I'd like to point out that since getting those original screenshots, the video has now rocketed to 22k views, 70% of which are search results. Getting that as our final figure was no accident either as having a high quality thumbnail really pulled people in.


Social Media

I'm going to go with Twitter first of all, because it's the best place to speak to others about what we do and if you follow a bunch of other creators, then it's amazingly helpful for keeping motivated. Support each other and just chat. We talk absolute bollocks on our Twitter, but we get a lot of laughs from it, and I've now started using the channel twitter more than my personal because it's a lot more satisfying. There's always a Twitter thread to be found on the subreddit somewhere and I can't recommend it enough to get involved. Don't just link dump and run, otherwise you'll never get any interaction. Give something to the people that they can discuss with you, jump in on conversations that people are having. Because of the great community here and on Twitter, I recently sent out a tweet asking for everyone we've helped in the last few months help us reach 450 subs and we got eight new people that night because we've been consitent personalities. With Twitter you're basically convincing people that follow you on there to click through on a video.

If you're here, then you're already getting involved in a community if it's 2016, then I probably sent you here), but get more involved. Share what you know. Help people with things that you know you can help on, not just with the idea to get some views yourself but to be a decent person, there's way too much competitiveness in the whole LP community, but if we can all band together and help out, then we can all grow a little bigger than those who are trying to go it alone.


As a sidenote, I've said it a lot in comments and I'll say it until Youtube stops being a thing, but to everyone making content: create the videos that you'd want to see

No TL;DR for you.
Great post! Nice to see a fellow funhaus/insidegaming fan on here. Cheers :D
 

ShoJoeshow

Active Member
Don't help much. My shtick is that I'm getting views (1731 views and 36 subscribers ATM of sending this) but little to no feedback, remarks, or anything on my videos, or my sites that lead to the channel.
 

YoungBonesGaming

Active Member
Don't help much. My shtick is that I'm getting views (1731 views and 36 subscribers ATM of sending this) but little to no feedback, remarks, or anything on my videos, or my sites that lead to the channel.
The answer to your point is right there in your comment. You've only got 36 subscribers and 1700 views across your entire channel and you've only been at this for literally a couple of months.

Realistically the main people that are seeing your content right now would be friends/family and other content creators.

There's no real way to force people to comment on what you have besides making engaging content that makes them want to comment. And as for leaving feedback, realistically no one else but you will care about your channel enough to go out of their way to leave feedback, and even if they did, if it were me and someone were to come by our channel and only comment on what we should have done rather than what we actually done, I'd consider it rude as hell unless it was someone I specifically asked their opinion for. One of the big keys to improving your content is being able to watch your own content objectively and learn how to spot things yourself on how to get better.

If you want feedback on your channel and what you're doing for a second opinion, create a Reddit account and head on over to r/letsplaycritiques, a place where people go to get feedback and where I frequent fairly often or head over to r/letsplay (which I moderate) and ask questions about things you might be struggling with.

Looking at your channel and comparing it with the points I've made in this post there's a lot of work that you still need to do and if you want me to, I can write up a proper critique for all aspects of your channel, but I'm just going to warn you now, I'm not known to stroke your ego and tell you how great you are, I'll tell you exactly what's going wrong with the channel but I'll also tell you how you can fix it.
 

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