30 Years Ago Today Super Mario Bros. was Released

The game was named the "pioneering" and "highly influential" title as The Greatest Game Of All Time, considering it to have aided in resurrecting...
By GameOverViper, Published: Sep 13, 2015 | Updated: Jan 19, 2016 | | |
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    Who knew 30 years ago that the Mario Brothers would still be the face of Nintendo today.

    Super Mario Bros.
    is a 1985 platform video game internally developed by Nintendo R&D4 and published by Nintendo as a pseudo-sequel to the 1983 game Mario Bros. It was originally released in Japan for the Family Computer on September 13, 1985, and later that year for the Nintendo Entertainment System in North America, Europe on May 15, 1987 andAustralia in 1987. It is the first of the Super Mario series of games. In Super Mario Bros., the player controls Mario and in a two-player game, a second player controls Mario's brother Luigi as he travels through the Mushroom Kingdom in order to rescue Princess Toadstool from the antagonist Bowser.

    In 2005, IGN's poll named the "pioneering" and "highly influential" title as The Greatest Game Of All Time, considering it to have aided in resurrecting the crashed American video game market of the 1980s. The game's mid-1980s release served to further popularize the side-scrolling subgenre of the already popular platform video game genre of the early 1980s. In addition to its definitive features, the game has also sold enormously well, and was the best-selling game of all time for a single platform for approximately three decades at over 40 million units, until Nintendo's Wii Sports took that title. The commercial success of Super Mario Bros. has caused it to be ported to almost every one of Nintendo's major gaming consoles. Nintendo released special red variants of the Wii and Nintendo DSi XL consoles in re-packaged, Mario-themed, limited edition bundles in late 2010 as part of the 25th anniversary of the game's release.

    Gameplay

    The player takes on the role of the main protagonist of the series, Mario. Mario's slightly younger brother, Luigi, is only playable by the second player in the game's multiplayer mode, and assumes the same plot role and functionality as Mario. The objective is to race through the Mushroom Kingdom, survive the main antagonist Bowser's forces, and save Princess Toadstool. The player moves from the left side of the screen to the right side in order to reach the flag pole at the end of each level.

    The game world has coins scattered around it for Mario to collect, and special bricks marked with a question mark ("?"), which when hit from below by Mario, may reveal more coins or a special item. Other "secret", often invisible, bricks may contain more coins or rare items. If the player gains a red and yellow Super Mushroom, Mario grows to double his size and can take one extra hit from most enemies and obstacles, in addition to being able to break bricks above him. Players are given a certain number of lives, and may gain additional lives by picking up green and orange 1-Up mushrooms, collecting 100 coins, defeating several enemies in a row with a Koopa shell, or bouncing on enemies successively without touching the ground. One life is lost when Mario takes damage while small, falls in a pit, or runs out of time. The game ends when all lives are lost.

    Mario's primary attack is jumping on top of enemies, though many enemies have differing responses to this. For example, a Goomba will flatten and be defeated, while a Koopa Troopa will temporarily retract into its shell, allowing Mario to use it as a projectile. These shells may be deflected off a wall to destroy other enemies, though they can also bounce back against Mario, which will hurt or kill him. Another attack, for enemies standing overhead, is to jump up and hit beneath the brick that the enemy is standing on. Another is the Fire Flower; when picked up, this item changes the color of Super Mario's outfit and allows him to throw fireballs, or only upgrades Mario to Super Mario if he isn't already so. A less common item is the Starman, which often appears when Mario hits certain concealed or otherwise invisible blocks. This item makes Mario temporarily invincible to most hazards and capable of defeating enemies on contact.

    The game consists of eight worlds with four sub-levels called "stages" in each world. The final stage of each world takes place in a castle where Bowser or one of his decoys are fought. The game also includes some stages taking place underwater, which contain different enemies. In addition, there are bonuses and secret areas in the game. Most secret areas contain more coins for Mario to collect, but some contain "warp pipes" that allow Mario to advance to later worlds in the game, skipping over earlier ones.

    Development
    Super Mario Bros, the successor to the 1983 arcade title Mario Bros., was designed by Shigeru Miyamoto and Takashi Tezuka, both of whom belonged to Nintendo's former Creative Department at the time. The game's development was motivated by a desire to give Famicom (i.e., Nintendo Entertainment System game cartridges) a swan song in light of the forthcoming Famicom Disk System, and to further progress Nintendo's work on "Athletic games". Originally, the game was based around a shooting mechanic with very different controls. A desire to focus on jumping and the mapping of the mechanic to the A button resulted in it being dropped. Unlike in Mario Bros., where Mario would be hurt by stomping on turtles without first flipping them on their backs, Mario could defeat turtles by stomping on their shells, as the developers decided the previous method had been illogical. The ability to have Mario change size was a result of basing level design around a smaller Mario, then intending to make his size bigger in the final version. They later decided it would be fun to have Mario become bigger as a Power-up. Early level design was focused on teaching players that Mushrooms were distinct from Goombas and would be beneficial to them: In World 1, level 1, the first Mushroom is difficult to avoid if it is released.

    Using Mushrooms to change size was influenced by folk tales in which people wander into forests and eat magical Mushrooms; this also resulted in the game world being named the "Mushroom Kingdom". The "Infinite 1-Up" trick was by design, but the developers did not expect players to be able to master it as well as they did.

    Development was aimed at keeping things simple, in order to have a new game available for the end-of-year shopping season. Originally an idea for a shoot-'em-up stage in which Mario would jump onto a cloud and fire at enemies was to be included; however, this was dropped to maintain the game's focus on jumping action, but the sky-based bonus stages still remained.

    Re-releases
    In early 2003, Nintendo re-released the game on the Game Boy Advance in Japan as part of their Famicom Minis collection and in the U.S. as part of the Classic NES Series. Unlike previous re-releases, these versions contain no graphical updates and all of the original glitches remain. Super Mario Bros. was one of the best-selling of these re-releases; according to the NPD Group (which tracks game sales in North America), this re-released version of Super Mario Bros. was the best-selling Game Boy Advance game in June 2004 to December 2004. In 2005, Nintendo released this game again for the GBA as part of its 20th Anniversary with a special edition, which sold approximately 876,000 units. Super Mario Bros. is also one of the 19 NES games included in the Nintendo GameCube game Animal Crossing. The only known way to unlock Super Mario Bros. in most versions is by use of a game modification device (like the Game Shark or Action Replay), though it was distributed as a Famitsu prize to owners of Doubutsu no Mori+. The game is fully emulated (in fact, it is the original ROM), so it includes every glitch from the NES including the Minus World glitch. Super Mario Bros. was released on December 2, 2006 in Japan, December 25, 2006 in North America and January 5, 2007 in PALregions for Wii's Virtual Console. As it is a copy of the original game, all glitches—including the Minus World—remain in the game. Super Mario Bros. is also one of the trial games available in the "Masterpieces" section in Super Smash Bros. Brawl. Super Mario Bros. was released on the Nintendo 3DS in September 2011 for members of Nintendo's 3DS Ambassador Program, and a general release came through in Japan on January 5, 2012, in North America on February 16, 2012 and in Europe on March 1, 2012.

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    GameOverViper
    Founder of Damnlag.com. Enjoys playing shooter games, primarily Call of Duty, Battlefield, Counter Strike and GTA V. Lazy when it comes to his own YouTube channel. Always trying to help others with there channel. Check his channel out at www.youtube.com/gameoverviper
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Comments

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  1. ZCo
    cant believe its been that long. i feel old now!
  2. HowToDudes
    I really loved the article, nice job. I used to play this game so much.
  3. Aurian MoonRose
    Great Retrospective review, this was the very first game that i had played. This brings back the memories of when i first played it, and at the same time This is almost got to be number 1 on the list of best games if only because it saved the video game industy and without this gaming may not be what it is today or not at all. worse case gaming could be nowhere near it is now if it started up later. Thank you mario and happy birthday.
  4. SplitScreen
    This game is simply EPIC! I love it, and the way it has gone over the past years. :)
      ROMMY likes this.
  5. Sentenza Gaming
    Great article, made me feel old since I saw the game hit the market.
      Lily likes this.